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Our Class News

  • Kim Fields returns to BeadFX for an exciting 3 day class

    When we get requests for an instructor to teach again at BeadFX, we know students want to repeat a wonderful experience. Such is the case of Kim Fields!

    Kim is an acclaimed artist and instructor with over 25 years of lampwork experience. On a whim, in 1999, Kim took a beginner’s lampworking class. Just a year later she found that working with glass was so fulfilling, she decided to leave her 20-year corporate career behind and devote herself completely to the art of glass beadmaking and jewelry design. Kim has taught at many of the most prestigious glass studios throughout the U.S. as well as in Europe and Japan. Her recent work can be seen at shows, galleries, and in numerous publications.

    “Nature has always informed and inspired my creativity, and it is the primary influence for my beads,” says Kim in her website biography. “Through the colors and textures of each bead design, I strive to capture a small reflection of nature’s beauty. As a birdwatcher, birds are a natural inspiration and using a sculptural approach, I strive to capture the bird in greater detail. Lampworking is a growth process for me and I will continue to explore new ways to express myself through glass.”

    Kim’s 3-day class in April will focus on Murrini techniques to create canes of floral components. Murrini are colored patterns or images made in a glass cane that are revealed when the cane is cut into thin cross-sections. One familiar style is the flower or star shape which, when used together in large numbers from a number of different canes is called millefiori. Murrini production first appeared in the Middle East more than 4,000 years ago and was revived by Venetian glassmakers on Murano in the early 16th century. Students in Kim’s classes will learn how to make the floral canes then how to incorporate them into beads.

    Floral Murrini Cane Workshop
    Friday, April 27 to Sunday, April 29; 10:00am – 5:00pm daily

    Learn to make a bouquet of beautiful floral canes and how to apply them to your beads. You should come away from this class knowing how to make all the components for each floral cane including different types of petals and stamens. Well also use a variety of reference materials for form and accuracy. Demonstrations will include making single and multi-petal floral cane. Techniques will include assembling canes, color mixing and overlays, heat control, pulling the cane to the desired thickness, and finally, application and encasement of floral murrini on beads. Skill level: Intermediate; Prerequisite: Must have lampworking experience

     

    Early Bird Special offer: Register on or before March 15 for only $600 plus HST. As of Friday, March 16, the class fee will be $675 plus HST.

    Click on the class title for complete information and including the on-line registration cart. A maximum of 8 students will be accepted for the class.

Our Latest Inspiration

  • Floating Rocks

    InspirationFX – Get your creative juices flowing


     

    by: Dwyn Tomlinson

    Rock it out with this floating rock creation! This project came together as an act of serendipity – happy coincidence. I had the sterling rocks on my table, thinking about a bracelet (which I also made, actually – sterling rocks with one lampwork bead, on stretchy elastic) and the Kaputt Pendant, with the bail, from the photo that I took for the website.

    And I thought that they looked really good together – and hey presto – next thing you know – I have this!You could make this without the curved tube too – the beads will stay on either side of the bail, so that’s alright. And you could, if you don’t like the floating look, fill in the space from the last rock bead to the clasp with small metal round beads or seedbeads.

    Or, you could try for black beading wire, and use crimps to hold the rock beads to the side and omit the tube bead, and wear it on a black cashmere sweater, and really go for the floating look! The contrast of floating and rock is fun!

    The pinch bail attaches to the Swarovski Kaputt pendant with a gentle squeeze to keep it in place.The bail fits easily over the gold curved tube – yes – I expect it will scratch a little with time. C’est la vie.

    String to the middle of your beading wire, add the sterling rocks on each end, and then leave a length of wire (this is why you are using the good, Extreme Gold Wire), and then crimp the ends, use a wire guardian if you like, and add a jumpring and a chain extender on one side for flexibility and a lobster clasp on the other.

    The rocks, being hollow, are a bit of a b—- to string. I suggest holding them up to a light so you can see right through the hole, and then poking the softflex through, seeing if you are lined up with the hole on the other side. Fortunately, with only 10 of them, it’s not too bad. ;-)You can use gold plated instead of gold filled just as easily if you have the components in your stash already.

     

    Components

    Go to our components list for this project and to buy what you need!

    Need some help with some of the techniques? Check our tips page.