Copper Pipe Pendants

We initially published this post back in 2010 – it has been far and away our most commented on post ever. We share it with you again for those of you who haven’t seen it before!

Initial post by Jennifer Tough
A while back I picked up a book by Stephanie Lee called Semi-precious Salvage. I just love her designs, as I’m quite enamored with the vintage-y, rough, dug out of the dirt look. Mixed media jewellery is quite intriguing to me – and I plan to explore it more over the next little while. I’m really just scratching the surface.

In Stephanie Lee’s book, she used copper pipes and copper sheet to create bezels, she further roughens up the look by covering the whole thing in solder. I was excited to see if I could take the little resin/glass pendants that are so popular, and kick it up a notch.? Of course, having an open back allows you to create a double sided pendant!? The process is crazy time consuming, but as I’ve discovered – If you make a whole bunch at a time, it’s not so bad 🙂
First step is to cut the tubing into little slices – for this, you’ll need a tube cutter from the hardware store. You could use a jewelers saw, but that would take even longer!I then used our handy hole punch pliers to create 2 holes on opposite sides.? A handmade balled copper headpin was inserted, and wired up into a wrapped loop.

To create a flat surface to stick my paper on, I used some transparent polymer clay, and then baked it in place. I suppose you don’t really need to bake it, since you’re encasing the whole thing in resin – but I did, as I felt I should for some reason…

Once my images were in place, I then filled each side with resin, letting each side dry for 2 days before filling the other side.

Once the pendants were fully cured, I used some renaissance wax to seal the copper to help prevent tarnishing.

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