Mixed-up media madness! Let the games begin!!

What do you think of, when I say mixed-up media madness? For me, it’s a total change from what I’ve been working on. But then again, is it really? My love for beads, may only be surpassed by my love for fibre! Is that like picking a favourite child, or pet? Is that too cruel? Or perhaps, just human nature? Let me say right now, that I have no intention of giving up beads! My mixed-up media madness, is sure to show up, every couple of years. It materializes in weird and wonderful ways, including a need to work with …

Huicholing

Huichol, Huicholing. To Huichol. Huichol has become a verb around here – we use it to describe the process of covering something with beads. It started when we started carrying the Beadswax, and it is now just part of our lexicon. So recently I found this artist – Jan Huling – who is working in a similar vein. She calls herself a “beadist” – a term that I find very appealing because it is so open-ended, and she makes wonderful surface designs with beads using thin lines of glue and pre-strung beads, which she lays down on the glue and …

Bead like you mean it: Adventures up north!

Are you a true bead fanatic? When you bead like you mean it, your beads will prevail, and your muse will be happy! Even though all of my creative goals have not been met (as laid out in last weeks blog post), I still plan to work on them. Ambitious goals are never a bad thing! Holiday activities require fluid plans! Change and challenge is quite often the norm! When I say bead like you mean it, it always brings Intuitive Bead Embroidery to mind. It’s one of my favourite beading activities. I reach for it first, and it’s my …

Huichol Beading!

We invite you to try Huichol Beading – and to encourage you – we’re offering 25% off all our seedbeads, shaped beads, and, just for fun – the rhinestones too! What is Huichol Beading? And how do you pronounce it? Huichol beading – pronounced wee-CHOL – is a style of beadwork originating with the indigenous people of the mountain ranges of north central Mexico. The technique is simple – take a pea-sized lump of a wax-pitch mixture, knead in your fingers until soft, flatten out to the size of a quarter, and press onto the item to be decorated. Then …